Frequently Asked Questions - Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in College Station, Texas Frequently Asked Questions - Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital

Frequently Asked Questions

For small animal appointments call (979) 845-2351 Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Emergencies accepted 24 hours a day

Q:  How do I know if my pet is having an emergency?

A:  You know your pet best. If you are noticing behaviors or changes that you are concerned with, you can call and discuss your concerns to a senior veterinary student who will relay your information to the veterinarian.  Together we can decide if your pet needs to be seen on emergency or if you can follow up with your primary veterinarian.

Q:  Can I bring my pet into the ER without a referral from my veterinarian?

A:  Yes, however; if your pet is currently under the care of a veterinarian, it is best to discuss referral with him or her.  Your veterinarian can call to discuss the case with us.

Q:  Since you are a teaching hospital, will you experiment on my pet?

A:  No, we do not perform any experimental treatments or procedure without your approval.  Currently, there are some experimental research trials underway, but your consent is needed before enrollment in any of these trials.

Q:  Is Texas A&M Small Animal Clinic more or less expensive than other veterinary hospitals?

A:  Our prices are comparable to other specialty or emergency hospitals who offer the same level of care.  Estimates are based on the needs of the patient and nature of the condition.  We will provide an estimate prior to treatment at which time a 50% deposit will be required.

Q:  Who will examine my pet?

A:  An emergency veterinarian and a senior veterinary student will examine your pet.  Since this is a teaching facility, students are involved in all aspects of patient care while under the direct supervision of veterinarians.

Q:  How long is the wait?

A:  This will vary based on what the current caseload is. Our emergency team will triage all incoming patients and treat the ones with the more serious, life threatening injuries first.  Our wait is often longer than at a typical veterinary hospital due to the teaching aspect for the students.